Airblast 101: A Handbook of Best Practices in Airblast Spraying

Jason Deveau, Application Technology Specialist, OMAFRA

Just in time for the holidays, Airblast 101 is a new book that describes best practices in airblast spraying in clear, conversational language. With more than 200 full-colour illustrations and 200 pages of content, Airblast 101 takes the reader from adjusting airblast settings for the first spray of the season all the way to winterizing the sprayer at the end of the season.

Perhaps you’re an airblast sprayer veteran looking to refresh your understanding or squeeze a bit more efficiency out of your applications. Perhaps you’re new to airblast spraying and need foundational information. Maybe you’re a farm manager, a government regulator, an agricultural extension specialist, an agrichemical sales representative or an academic researcher. No matter your occupation, if you want to learn more about airblast spraying, there’s something in this book for you!

The handbook focusses on three central themes:

-Understanding the forces that influence droplet behaviour.

-How to optimize airblast sprayers to match the target and minimize waste.

-How to diagnose spray coverage and make changes to improve it.

Go to www.sprayers101.com and type ‘airblast101’ into the search bar. From there you can download a copy as an interactive pdf, or an eBook for Apple or Android tablets. This is a large file, so please be patient and stay on the webpage until the screen changes and gives you an option.

There is also limited number of printed versions that we can arrange to ship on request. They are ring-bound with a wrap-around water-resistant cover and are printed on a high-quality glossy stock. They’re hardy enough for a tractor cab and nice enough for a book shelf. In order to recover costs, we have to charge $30.00 CAD for the printed versions, plus shipping. If you’d like a book, email me at the email address at the bottom on the webpage.

Happy spraying

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This entry was posted in Apples, Apricots, Berries, Blueberries, Cherries, Currants, Elderberries, Cranberries and more, Grapes, Insects and Diseases, Nectarines, Peaches, Pears, Plums, Uncategorized and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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