Preemergence Herbicide Applications in Grapes

PREEMERGENCE HERBICIDE APPLICATIONS IN GRAPES

Kristen Obeid MSc, OMAFRA Weed Management Program Lead – Horticulture

New Plantings

Herbicide Herbicide Group Rate (kg/ha) Timing Tank Mix Information
Frontier Max (dimethenamid) 15 0.963 L/ha PRE – Do NOT apply during bud swell, bud break or first flush of new growth.

 

Established Plantings

Herbicide Herbicide Group Rate Timing Tank Mix Information
Alion (indaziflam) 29 0.375 L/ha PRE – Do NOT apply prior to any soil disturbance. May be tank mixed with glyphosate and glufosinate ammonium
Casoron (dichlobenil) 20 110-225 kg/ha PRE – moist, unfrozen ground in fall or spring
Chateau (flumioxazin) 14 0.28–0.42 kg/ha PRE – 2 applications, 30 days apart. Do NOT apply after budbreak May be tank mixed with glyphosate
Frontier Max (dimethenamid) 15 0.963 L/ha PRE – Do NOT apply during bud swell, bud break or first flush of new growth.
Karmex (diuron) 7 2.25-6.7 kg/ha PRE – spring and / or fall. Applications must be 90 days apart. Do NOT exceed the maximum rate per year or injury could result.
Princep Nine-T (simazine) 5 4–5 kg/ha PRE – apply after hills are removed but before weed emergence. May be tank mixed with glyphosate and glufosinate ammonium

NOTE: Alion can only be applied to established plantings > 5 years; Casoron and Chateau can only be applied to established plantings > 2 years; Karmex and Princep Nine-T can only be applied to established plantings > 3years.

Tank Mixes

Tank mixes with burn down herbicides (glyphosate, glufosinate ammonium and paraquat) if emerged weeds are present are needed for Alion and Chateau because neither of these herbicides have activity on germinated weeds. Consider tank mixes with other PRE herbicides to both broaden the weed spectrum and manage the selection of herbicide resistant weeds.

 

Table 1. Selectivity of Weeds to Preemergence Herbicides Registered on Grapes in Ontario

 

 

C = Control

 

P = Partial control

 

N = No control

 

   = No information

diuron (Karmex) dichlobenil (Casoron) dimethenamide (Frontier Max) flumioxazin (Chateau) indaziflam (Alion) napropamide (Devrinol) simazine (Princep Nine-T)
Annual Broadleaves
Canada fleabane P N N C N P
Chickweed P C N C C C C
Clovers P N N N P C
Cocklebur C N N N P C
Goosefoot C N N C C C
Groundsel, common N C N C C P P
Hairy fleabane P N N C N P
Henbit C N N C P C
Lamb’s-quarters C C N C C C C
Lady’s-thumb C P P P C P C
Mustard C C N C C P C
Nightshade C N C C N C
Pigweed C C C C P C C
Prickly lettuce C N N P P C C
Purslane C C N C C C
Shepherd’s-purse C C N C C P C
Sowthistle C C N P C C
Spotted spurge N C N C C C P
Annual Grasses
Annual bluegrass C P N C N C C
Barnyard grass C P C C C C P
Crabgrass, large P C C C C C N
Fescues C P N P N C P
Foxtails P C C C C C C
Perennials (seedling)
Field bindweed P P N N C N P
Perennials (established)
Canada thistle P P N N
Dandelion N P N C
Field bindweed N P N N P N N
Nutsedge, yellow P P P N N N
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About Kristen Obeid

OMAFRA Weed Management Program Lead - Horticulture
Image | This entry was posted in Fresh Grapes, Grapes, Pest Management, Weeds, Wine Grapes. Bookmark the permalink.

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